101 things to love about Los Angeles: “Yes, the weather is perfect. But there are so many more under-the-radar reasons why people love the City of Angels—moments, places, and experiences that make living here so pleasant and unbelievably magical that sometimes it’s hard to tell whether you’re still alive or have died and gone to heaven. Let’s count the ways we love LA.”

Coded Geographies: “What if the stories L.A. told about itself relegated you to the margins? This episode explores two underground guidebooks — The Negro Travelers’ Green Book and The Address Book — that reveal the hidden geographies many Angelenos had to navigate, exposing Los Angeles as a place of coded segregation and resistance.”

Not Gone. Yet.: “In a time of great upheaval for the United States, it is hard to keep track of the many risks to our national landscapes. Even our nationally recognized and federally protected sites are under threat from privatization or lax oversight, making them vulnerable to destructive practices that place monetary gain over equitable enjoyment of parkland. Open Season on Open Space, this year’s Landslide program from the Cultural Landscape Foundation, minces no words on this subject, calling out municipalities, states, and the federal government for undermining a century’s worth of progress for our public lands, parks, and national monuments.”

This great L.A. walk takes in architectural gems, and fine city views: “An important L.A. architectural artifact and a small public green space, hidden in the heart of East Hollywood, are the backdrop for this short stroll in the Barnsdall Art Park. It’s mostly flat, but involves several staircases. Shady on a hot day, this 36-acre park offers fine views of the city and a lovely lawn for picnics.”

City approves final plan for education center at Deukmejian Wilderness Park: The 26-year-old vision for an education center at Deukmejian Wilderness Park in north Glendale is one step closer to reality, following a vote by the Glendale City Council Tuesday. The 709-acre park near the San Gabriel Mountains has 7 miles of recreational trails. About 12 of those acres are home to a park center and the historic Le Mesnager Barn, built between 1914 and 1918, according to city documents.

As 2017 year comes to a close, the AHBE LAB contributors are taking time to look back at our year’s worth of posts. We are each identifying the most memorable post and sharing what we found interesting, informative, and inspiring. Enjoy the flashback, and let us know which post you thought was most memorable.

I remember my colleague Clarence Lacy offered an excellent post in July chronicling his visit to the Salton Sea. His post’s title, Is the Salton Sea a Temporal or Failed Landscape?, asks an important and specific question about this fascinating oddity of the California landscape.

The Salton Sea is a manmade anomaly born out of our thirst for water and a consequence of creating the state’s water infrastructure. The Salton Sea is both a living monument to Southern California’s historic water-grab in the early 20th Century, and also an example of how our natural environment adapts to humankind’s follies.

Clarence’s photos are memorably beautiful, haunting, and disturbing. His post represents what I consider to be the best of what the landscape architecture profession aims to accomplish, asking the questions that help us understand our relationship with the earth and our place in it.

The original post here: Is the Salton Sea a Temporal or Failed Landscape?

As 2017 year comes to a close, the AHBE LAB contributors are taking time to look back at our year’s worth of posts. We are each identifying the most memorable post and sharing what we found interesting, informative, and inspiring. Enjoy the flashback, and let us know which post you thought was most memorable.

I believe the skill of an artist derives from the combination of their passions with a devotion to practice. It’s not something that’s visible every day (maybe following a writer who blogs daily), and it’s usually done behind the scenes, often gone unnoticed and even unappreciated.

Jenni’s interview with Chuan – complete with her “sketch calendars” shown behind her monitor – captured the development of her tremendous sketching/designing skill that is evident to the entire office. Her skill has been a constant inspiration to me in the development of my writing, sketching, and designing abilities – a practice I believe should be a daily practice within our profession: to create something every day.

The original post here: AHBE Lab Interviews: Chuan Ding – Sketching: Praxis & Pleasure

As 2017 year comes to a close, the AHBE LAB contributors are taking time to look back at our year’s worth of posts. We are each identifying the most memorable post and sharing what we found interesting, informative, and inspiring. Enjoy the flashback, and let us know which post you thought was most memorable.

After looking back at our vast collection of posts from this year, it was this photo from Katherine Montgomery’s Rabbit Routes: A Photo Essay that stuck most in my mind. Something about the simplicity of the image and its sensitivity to perspective speaks so poignantly to the kind of empathy I believe is needed to help define and expand ecological thinking.

Not only does this image reinforce how important our urban parks are for animal habitat, but also how important they are for humans in an urban context to form relationships with nonhumans. Katherine’s photograph reminds me to leave room when defining space for others, and inspires me to be sensitive while spending time in the wild in the city. These images help me shift focus when thinking about how to instigate change in how we define ecological design by engaging with, and relating to, existing communities.

The original post here: Rabbit Routes: A Photo Essay

As 2017 year comes to a close, the AHBE LAB contributors are taking time to look back at our year’s worth of posts. We are each identifying the most memorable post and sharing what we found interesting, informative, and inspiring. Enjoy the flashback, and let us know which post you thought was most memorable.

As an avid fan of all things transportation related, including the highly popular High Line in New York City and also our local transportation systems, I particularly remember Cristhian Barajas’, Drosscapes: Railroad Bridges as Community Vantage Points as the most memorable AHBE LAB post this year.

Cristhian’s post is not only an exploration of the history of LA’s train infrastructure, it also investigates and promotes the lines as a potential and prime candidates for re-use as non-vehicular transportation corridors across Los Angeles. Though he notes the challenges designers would likely face in designing for these conditions, I find the possibilities for making these non-vehicular links between communities an inspiring challenge worth undertaking! I would love for AHBE to one day be awarded a rail retrofit project to make Cristhian’s observations a reality.

The original post here: Drosscapes: Railroad Bridges as Community Vantage Points