Welcome to our ongoing series of Cal Poly Pomona Coastal Resiliency posts, featuring the observations of 4th year undergraduate students in the Landscape Architecture program.

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Working Scope of Site; Diagram by Amanda F.

The Lower Westside of Long Beach is an area especially vulnerable to sea level rise. Between three and six feet of sea level rise will cause significant impacts to public safety and property damage in this area. Both the NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer and the newly updated Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS v3.0) issued by USGS for Southern California help with spatial understanding of the potential impacts related to these environmental changes.

The Lower Westside of Long Beach is also one of the sites selected by a group of students to develop strategies for adaptation. According to student Amanda F., “Various strategies involving wetland habitat restoration will be implemented for the various scaled archetypes available within our overall 215-acre scope.” Her strategy is shown above.

Graphic by Iliana V.

Amphibious Neighborhood Adaptation Strategies graphic by Iliana V.

One strategy shown above and developed by Iliana V., permits the rising seas in by digging canals along existing roadways and right of way corridors, using the fill material to create new high ground. People living in this neighborhood might abandon their cars to high ground and travel around in shallow bottomed boats while waiting for water from storm events or tides to recede. This approach harkens back to a time when waterways were the dominant transportation and trade superhighways. While the strategy is burdened with a myriad of challenges, it shares some allegiance with the Dutch Room for the Rover Programme, which is redesigning the city to give the river space to flood safely.

We look forward to learning more about the student’s strategies during their final presentation at AHBE this Friday from 3-6pm.


For previous Cal Poly Pomona Partnership posts see:

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