As autumn officially arrives later this month, I’ve begun taking stock of our summer kitchen garden and the lessons learned in tending to its needs. I measure success by how close I’m able to provide a feast such as this aspirational bounty. It might be a lofty dream, but I retackle the challenge each spring with optimism.

Alas, I’ve fallen short yet again. Tis the fate of the kitchen garden of this landscape architect! But yet, there were many lessons learned, and even a few successes:


Right now my geraniums – potted flowers rooted in memories of my Grandmother’s backyard in San Bernardino – are blooming profusely. This plethora of deep color pollinated with nostalgia keep these flowers in my backyard near the kitchen garden.


Only one tomato plant thrived to provide a number of sweet cherry tomatoes this season. And even now, though there are still plenty of fruit on its vines, the leaves have begun turning yellow. The other three tomato plants grew lovely green leaves, but also sprouted fruit with blossom end rot, producing inedible fruit. Ugh! Seems cherry tomatoes are less susceptible to this rot (and are full of delicious flavor!).


A summer garden mainstay, our towering drying sunflower blooms continue to provide food for local birds and squirrels.


The marigolds add some spots of bright color in the garden, while the watermelon continues to flower and set fruit. And what tasty fruit they have produced on their long vines! I will definitely plant more again next spring.


Though notably early in the season, some pomegranates fruiting on our huge shrub look ready for harvest already.


I’m pleased to report of a small, yet notable victory: I finally got a basil plant to flourish! Usually it’s dead within a couple of weeks. But I think I found a semi-shaded spot next to the French and Mexican tarragon plants where the basil seems to thrive. Each of these herbs provide a renewable culinary resource to cut to use while cooking – adding fantastic flavor and aroma to every dish – growing back again and again.


This was my attempt to get a creative shot from underneath our dwarf Meyer lemon tree looking up into its canopy. Periodically, I’ve been able to harvest fruit from its branches this summer, but I’m expecting an even bigger harvest this winter.

I’ve also come to the pragmatic conclusion that I need to install drip irrigation system on a timer to keep everything watered sufficiently. By the end of summer, I undoubtedly grow tired of dragging around the hose every very hot morning!

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