Urban Heat Island Effect_0

All Roads Paved with Asphalt Trap 90% of the Sun’s Heat—That’s a Problem: “For cities the problem is even bigger. On top of the rising temperatures, the urban heat island effect results in an additional 1.8 to 5.4°F burden for urban dwellers during the day and up to 22°F in the evenings. Concrete buildings, asphalt paved roads radiating accumulated heat throughout the night, and lack of trees contribute to the making of scorching cities. Active measures will be needed to reduce the risk of heat-related health problems.”

What the Garden-Hacking Grandmas and Grandpas of South Korea Know: “Gardening here is not a hobby. It comes from the realization within people that there is inherent value in tending a garden and taking time to be a part of nature.”

Meet Me in the Trees: “Aloft, the usual corporate sounds of clicking doors, conference calls, and heels on concrete melt away. A fall wind sweeps through emerald branches. Every once in a while, a pinecone drops to the deck with a soft thud. A sudden ruckus breaks the gentle morning hush: a squirrel scrambling for breakfast charges across the arms of nearby hemlock and western red cedar…”

Problem Not Solved, But Not a Problem: “Assembling a decade of design and scholarly research, Bélanger provides readers with a much-needed alternative history of urbanization (primarily in mid- to late 20th and early 21st-century North America), as well as a survey of the contemporary forces that drive urbanization patterns today. These aspects of the book are complemented by an account of the accompanying epistemological shifts brought about by new understandings of complexity and ecology as well as a resurgence of the importance of geography, and all of these facets add up to a convincing challenge to many of the ideological positions that continue to dominate the planning, design, and engineering of urbanism today.”

A Pioneer in Public Space: “Lawrence Halprin might not be a household name, but his work has been seen and enjoyed by millions of people in Downtown Los Angeles over the decades. The landscape architect designed the Bunker Hill Steps across from the Central Library, next to U.S. Bank Tower. He also created the design for one of Downtown’s few green spaces, Grand Hope Park, next to the FIDM campus. So it is only fitting that the late Halprin is being honored in a Downtown museum. Last month, the A+D Museum in the Arts District opened the exhibit The Landscape Architecture of Lawrence Halprin.”

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