All photos: Wendy Chan

I recently visited the city of Marrakech in Morocco, where I found myself captivated by the city’s various medinas – the maze-like network of narrow streets that weaves to create dense and distinct neighborhoods. A medina is characterized by walled-in narrow streets containing public facilities like souks (traditional markets), fountains, and mosques, and found within North African and Maltese cities.

Some of the walls surrounding the Marrakech medinas date back to the 12th century. Made with locally sourced orange-red clay, it becomes obvious how Marrakech earned its nickname of the “Red City”.

The buildings within a medina are all enclosed with tall walls which adds to a sense of spatial enclosure and the maze-like setting. But just when you think you are completely lost, the narrow streets open up to various public squares and plazas bustling with activities. These open markets and food stalls help re-orient visitors and locals
alike.

As I was exploring the medina, I stumbled upon various markets where local residents do their daily shopping. There are open markets dedicated to produce, alongside swap meets for trading and selling of used houseware and clothes.

We visited various medinas within the city of Marrakech, noting each one representing its own character. But they offered easy walkability, a great sense of community, and were all populated with friendly people, their hospitality often accompanied with the offer of delicious mint tea.

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