Grand Park, DTLA. Creative Commons photo by Joe Wolf (CC BY-ND 2.0)

How can Landscape Architecture Address Imminent Design Realities?: “As landscape architects, we are trained to design for dynamic conditions – our landscapes are intended to evolve over time with the changing seasons of the year and with the processes of maturity and decay over the course of decades. But with climate change we now are dealing with a new dimension in dynamic design. Planting and soils conditions are changing in unforeseen ways. The typical lifespan of a public landscape is about 30 years on average. What we design and plant now will have to work both today and in a much dryer, warmer future predicted some few decades from now.”

11 ugly urban underpasses now functioning as public parks: When Manhattan’s High Line opened on the west side in 2009, locals and visitors alike flocked to the revitalized railroad trestle to marvel at its transformation into a gorgeous and walkable park. In Seattle, a decades-old project turned a downtrodden underpass into a skateboarding destination. In Toronto, a just-completed project created an ice rink under the highway. All are examples of a new era in underpass design—one that emphasizes high-impact solutions to reconnect neighborhoods and revitalize communities.

4 Reasons Why ASLA is Celebrating African American History Month: “February marks African American History Month as a time to celebrate the accomplishments of African Americans in every endeavor of our history. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) offers four reasons why it is celebrating.”

Palm Springs planned community boasts an olive grove in the desert: “Palm Springs is the latest city to embrace environmentally conscious design, as 300 acres of what was originally slated for a golf course will instead become an ecologically-oriented planned community. Miralon, a 1,150-unit development in Coachella Valley with 75 acres of olive groves, will join agricultural neighborhoods across the country when it opens this fall.”

This Land is Your Land – Rotting cabins, closed trails: why we’re shining a light on US national parks: “The National Park Service is the protector of some of America’s greatest environmental and cultural treasures. Yet a huge funding shortfall means that the strain of America’s passion for its parks is showing. Trails are crumbling and buildings are rotting. In all there is an $11bn backlog of maintenance work that repair crews have been unable to perform, a number that has mostly increased every year in the past decade.”

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