The ‘Transit-Oriented Teens’ Are Coming to Save Your City: “Per Eldred’s estimation, the TOTs generate 100 to 150 posts per day. What gets shared nowadays are mostly news articles and links, but urban-y riffs on Thomas the Tank Engine, the peak performance guy, and the rest of the internet’s strange cast of meme characters are still in the mix. Including a lot of appreciation for transit.”

26 Things to Do in Los Angeles This Spring: Curbed LA’s pocket guide offers a map of 26 essential things to do in Los Angeles, curated by their editors and updated seasonally. Focusing on cultural institutions, architecture, the outdoors, and beautiful spaces, the map includes picks of well-known classics and new favorites, from the Getty to Echo Park Lake to the Museum of Neon Art.

We are All At Risk In LA’s Slow, Aging Infrastructure Death: “The LA Times has reported that 20% of the city’s water pipes were installed before 1931. These pipes were supposed to last 100 years. Meaning all will reach the end of their useful lives in the next 15 years. These aged pipes are responsible for 50% of all water main leaks, and replacing them is a looming, multi-billion-dollar problem for the City of Angels.”

The Sierra Nevada snowpack will be 64% smaller by the end of this century. We need to prepare now: “Although recent storms have dumped heavy snow across the Sierra Nevada, Monday’s snowpack measurement will almost certainly show that it is still well below average. Last week, the Sierra-wide reading put the total snowpack at 15.8 inches of water content, or 43% below normal. Here’s an even more sobering reality. According to our new research, such spring snow measurements will be considered far above average in the decades to come.”

Understanding What Makes Plants Happy: “We have to understand that plants are social creatures. Our garden plants evolved as members of diverse social networks. Take a butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa, named this year’s Perennial Plant of the Year by the industry group the Perennial Plant Association), for example. The height of its flower is exactly the height of the grasses it grows among. Its narrow leaves hug its stems to efficiently emerge through a crowded mix. It has a taproot that drills through the fibrous roots of grasses. Everything about that plant is a reaction to its social network. And it is these social networks that make plantings so resilient.”

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