Posts by AHBE LAB

Gridlock resulting from vehicles and pedestrians “blocking the box” at the intersection of 1st Avenue and 57th Street in New York City. Photo by Rgoogin (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Worse Gridlock, More Inequality? 3 Ways Self-Driving Cars Could Change Cities: “Cities could be caught off guard by a new traffic crisis, and be forced to step in to regulate how many AVs they’ll allow on the road. They could also regulate the cost of these luxury rides to help pay for ride access in lower-income areas. Either way, the point is clear: Cities will need to be prepared to step in as this tech radically shifts the carefully planned “calculus” of urban transit.”

The Streets of Tomorrow: “Whether or not autonomous vehicles will allow for utopian cities of tomorrow depends on careful planning and policies today, says writer Brian Barth. And the future of autonomous vehicles might not look as green as we’re imagining. A new landscape by Ki Concepts on Honolulu’s Ford Island—site of the Pearl Harbor attack in World War II—weaves the richly layered history of the site into a sleek, cohesive design. And a new streetscape redesign by CRSA in the Sugar House business district of Salt Lake City turns a large thoroughfare into an inviting multimodal streetscape.”

Sight and Insight in the California Desert: “In our era of rapidly shifting domestic arrangements, nearly everyone — young people living alone or aging couples in communal compounds — seems badly served by architecture designed for the increasingly vestigial nuclear family. The cultish Marie Kondo’s admonitions to cast out the nonessential seems ripped from Zittel’s playbook; the conceptual underpinnings for the swelling phalanx of tiny, modular dwellings that evade byzantine zoning regulations and create a more mobile society can be found in Zittel’s experiments as well.”

A Controversial Plan to Drain Water From the Desert? Go for It, Trump Administration Says: “The publicly traded Cadiz Inc. — which has a market value of nearly $300 million — owns 34,000 acres in the valley, land that is surrounded on all sides by the Mojave Trails National Monument. You’d never know to look at it but underneath the arid land lies the Fenner Basin, a massive aquifer that holds between 17 million and 34 million acre-feet of water, about as much water as in Lake Mead. Cadiz currently uses the water for its 500 acres of farmland. But no one gets rich growing lemons in the desert.”

The Economics of the Office: Why Do We Still Commute? “There are many reasons to believe commuting is stupid. It wastes resources. It’s bad for the environment. It’s unproductive time that we’re not paid for. It costs us money. It’s stressful. It’s associated with higher rates of depression, obesity, cardiovascular disease, divorce, death, and a whole host of other maladies. We report we hate it more than anything else in our routines and that we’re happier when we get to more regularly work from home. Why, then, must office workers continue to do it?”

Conservation for Cities
It’s time to think differently about cities and nature. Understanding how to better connect our cities with the benefits nature provides will be increasingly important as people migrate to cities and flourish in them. All this urban growth, along with challenges of adapting to climate change, will require a new approach to infrastructure if we’re going to be successful. Yet guidance on how to plan and implement projects to protect or restore natural infrastructure is often hard to come by. With “Conservation for Cities”, Robert McDonald offers a comprehensive framework for maintaining and strengthening the supporting bonds between cities and nature through innovative infrastructure projects.
When: November 2nd, 6pm
Where: UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation

Landscape as Catalyst: Lawrence Halprin’s Legacy and Los Angeles
The Cultural Landscape Foundation, in collaboration with the A+D Architecture and Design Museum, is organizing a public, daylong symposium on November 4, 2017, that will examine the influences and accomplishments of renowned landscape architect Lawrence Halprin (1916 – 2009) and his impact on the renaissance of downtown Los Angeles. Held as part of a three-month series of public events honoring Halprin’s rich local and national legacy, this symposium will be suitable for enthusiasts of Modernist design and landscape architecture, practitioners and urban planners, fans of Los Angeles and those interested in the city’s history, and others.
When: November 04th, 9:30am to 4:00pm
Where: A+D Architecture and Design Museum, 900 East 4th Street, Los Angeles, 90013

Neural Exchange – Research Lecture with John Gerrard
2016 Art + Technology Lab grant recipient John Gerrard introduces his project Neural Exchange. Inspired by conversations with Lab technology advisors, the artist researched neural networks, a type of machine intelligence that mimics networks of neurons in the brain. Gerrard will present these artistic experiments in lecture form alongside the performance debut of a generated simulation. A publication featuring interviews with practitioners from Google, NVIDIA and elsewhere, relating to this powerful new computing form will be handed out during the event.
When: November 1st, 7pm
Where: LACMA | Bing Theater

Aerial Futures: Leading Edge
Drawing on the expertise of prominent airport terminal designers, industry leaders and disruptive innovators, Aerial Futures is a forum for knowledge sharing and exchange. Keynotes, presentations and panels will showcase leading thinking and projects related to terminal creation and operation, from components to user experience. Airports are taking the lead as intricately designed, highly frequented and resource-intensive structures that define how we travel, trade and connect with each other, now and into the future.
When: November 2nd-3rd, 2017
Where: Architecture and Design Museum Los Angeles

A Tale of Two Cities in a Hotter World: Los Angeles and Beijing
Climate change is the existential crisis of the 21st century. How it plays out, how we can curb it, and how we adjust to the changes already underway will define our generation. This fall, the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum, in collaboration with UCLA Institute of Environment and Sustainability, has designed a new kind of climate series; a four-night conversation between the L.A. community and some of the world’s experts on all things climate change.
When: November 2nd, 6pm
Where: Natural History Museum

The Future Today
Physicists say, “time is flexible, stretchable, even reversible.” But “we are all futurists today” as the past, present and future morph together in real and virtual time and where tomorrow may depend on leaving options open now.
When: November 5th, 1:30–3:30 PM
Where: The Rancho, Los Alamitos

 

Urban Heat Island Effect_0

All Roads Paved with Asphalt Trap 90% of the Sun’s Heat—That’s a Problem: “For cities the problem is even bigger. On top of the rising temperatures, the urban heat island effect results in an additional 1.8 to 5.4°F burden for urban dwellers during the day and up to 22°F in the evenings. Concrete buildings, asphalt paved roads radiating accumulated heat throughout the night, and lack of trees contribute to the making of scorching cities. Active measures will be needed to reduce the risk of heat-related health problems.”

What the Garden-Hacking Grandmas and Grandpas of South Korea Know: “Gardening here is not a hobby. It comes from the realization within people that there is inherent value in tending a garden and taking time to be a part of nature.”

Meet Me in the Trees: “Aloft, the usual corporate sounds of clicking doors, conference calls, and heels on concrete melt away. A fall wind sweeps through emerald branches. Every once in a while, a pinecone drops to the deck with a soft thud. A sudden ruckus breaks the gentle morning hush: a squirrel scrambling for breakfast charges across the arms of nearby hemlock and western red cedar…”

Problem Not Solved, But Not a Problem: “Assembling a decade of design and scholarly research, Bélanger provides readers with a much-needed alternative history of urbanization (primarily in mid- to late 20th and early 21st-century North America), as well as a survey of the contemporary forces that drive urbanization patterns today. These aspects of the book are complemented by an account of the accompanying epistemological shifts brought about by new understandings of complexity and ecology as well as a resurgence of the importance of geography, and all of these facets add up to a convincing challenge to many of the ideological positions that continue to dominate the planning, design, and engineering of urbanism today.”

A Pioneer in Public Space: “Lawrence Halprin might not be a household name, but his work has been seen and enjoyed by millions of people in Downtown Los Angeles over the decades. The landscape architect designed the Bunker Hill Steps across from the Central Library, next to U.S. Bank Tower. He also created the design for one of Downtown’s few green spaces, Grand Hope Park, next to the FIDM campus. So it is only fitting that the late Halprin is being honored in a Downtown museum. Last month, the A+D Museum in the Arts District opened the exhibit The Landscape Architecture of Lawrence Halprin.”

“Architecture Exposed” LIGA Book Presentation
The Neutra VDL House invites you to the launch of the second book of LIGA, Space for Architecture, Mexico City. The volume “Architecture Exposed” has the exhibition of architecture as its central theme. Founding directors Wonne Ickx and Ruth Estevez, will engage in a conversation with architecture critic, historian and curator Sylvia Lavin on curating architecture.
When: October 28th, 4-6pm
Where: Neutra VDL House, 2300 Silver Lake Blvd, Los Angeles, California 90039

Dia de los Muertos at Hollywood Forever
Hollywood Forever Cemetery is proud to present the 18th annual Dia de los Muertos festival:
The Legacy of Posada – El Legado De Posada. For our 18th Annual Dia de los Muertos, we tip our feather and flower adorned hat to the Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada. Over 100 years ago, Posada gave us many of the foundational images of Dia de los Muertos that are still venerated today and which have become treasured images of Mexican culture and identity. J.G. Posada reminds us that art is power – political and social speech – mass produced by the printing presses and now social media. Posada’s La Catrina asks us to embrace the beauty and grace inherent in facing our own death and the inevitable loss of those we love. By facing loss with love, and art, we find transcendence.
When: October 28th; 12pm – 12am
Where: Hollywood Forever Cemetery, 6000 Santa Monica Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90038

Smorgasburg L.A.
Smorgasburg LA is open every Sunday on the five-acre site of the weekday Alameda Produce Market in Downtown Los Angeles, which is part of a larger, new development called ROW DTLA. Each Sunday, find dozens of exciting food vendors at Smorgasburg LA, plus sophisticated shopping from the realms of design, craft, style, vintage, wellness, and more. Cultural events, pop-ups, and other surprises transform the vast site into a new node in Downtown LA’s burgeoning scene, and a unique destination for the region.
When: October 29th; 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Where: The Row DTLA; 777 S. Alameda St., Los Angeles, CA

Sergei Tchoban Architectural Drawings
On Friday 27th of October at 4pm an afternoon lecture called Drawn Visions and book signing of the monograph Sergei Tchoban Architecture Drawings will take place at the A+D Architecture and Design Museum in cooperation with the Goethe-Institut Los Angeles. This lecture is concurrent with Sergei Tchoban Architectural Drawings exhibition opening reception at the AD Museum at 7pm. The exhibition presents design sketches, imaginary travel studies and architectural fantasies depicting the contrasty dialogue between the historical and contemporary architecture. The show is on view at the A+D Architecture and Design Museum until 8th of January 2018.
When: October 27th, 4pm
Where: A+D Architecture and Design Museum; 900 E 4th St, Los Angeles, CA 90013

Pasadena Heritage Craftsman Weekend 2017
A tribute to Pasadena’s unique contributions to the American Arts & Crafts Movement, Craftsman Weekend is the largest most comprehensive celebration of the Craftsman Movement in the Western United States. The Weekend’s offerings will include a tour of significant Craftsman-era houses, a variety of bus and walking tours, an Exposition Show & Sale of over 40 exhibitors featuring antique and contemporary furniture and decorative arts, a silent auction, presentations and exclusive receptions at historic sites.
When: October 26th; 4:00 PM and October 29th, 8:00 PM
Where: Pasadena, CA

In Pursuit of Flora: 18th-Century Botanical Drawings from The Huntington’s Art Collections
European exploration of other lands during the so-called Age of Discovery revealed a vast new world of plant life that required description, cataloging, and recording. By the 18th century, the practice of botanical illustration had become an essential tool in the study of natural history. From lusciously detailed drawings of fruit and flowers by Georg Dionysius Ehret (1708-1770), a collaborator of Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus, to depictions of more exotic examples by Matilda Conyers (1753-1803), “In Pursuit of Flora” reveals 18th-century European appreciation for the beauty of the natural world.
When: October 28th – February 19th, 2018
Where: The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens; 1151 Oxford Road, San Marino, CA 91108

Edible Options for Harvested Seeds | San Bernardino Regional Seed Library Workshop
This month’s seed library presentation will be about edible seeds. We have spent the year so far talking about plant breeding, seed cleaning, seed saving…. but what about seed eating?! We will talk about which seeds are edible, and different cleaning and preparation techniques and seed eating around the globe. Some seeds are toxic though, and we will go over some of those too. But……of course… Always do your research before you eat interesting and unusual things out of the garden or the forest! Don’t forget to check out our “what to plant” list for this month in our seed library and pick up or drop off some seeds there, too!
When: October 28th, 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Where: Chino Basin Water Conservation District, 4594 San Bernardino Street, Montclair, CA 91763

CA Native Garden with James Maxwell
Join expert horticulturist, James Maxwell, as he explains the aspects of planting and caring for a California native garden. Learn about different California native plants, plant pairings for design possibilities, and the needs of native plants to better maintain them in your outdoor space. Also, discover how to incorporate native plants in your existing garden to reduce watering needs and improve wildlife habitat.
When: October 28th, 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Where: 2301 San Joaquin Hills Rd, Corona Del Mar, CA 92625

Japanese Garden at Descanso Gardens in La Cañada Flintridge, California, USA. Photo: Creative Commons/Public domain.

Descanso Gardens Japanese Garden Festival
Descanso celebrates the 50th anniversary of its Japanese Garden with this family-friendly festival. New this year: Experience the ancient music and dance performed in the Imperial Court of Japan! Activities free to members except where noted. Click here to see Sunday’s schedule.
When: Saturday, October 14, 9:00AM
Where: Descanso Gardens

Downtown LA Art Walk
Art exists in every part of Downtown—from morning to night—you will always encounter artistry that feeds all of the senses. From the eye catching Murals found throughout the City streets to the enticing scents and tastes of restaurants, each of our tours offers a unique experience of Downtown. Curated for a variety of audiences, from Kindergarteners and Art Enthusiasts to new and experienced Collectors, we pride ourselves in bringing enriching experiences to a larger public.
When: October 12, 2017
Where: The next Gallery Tour meets at the Lounge at 634 S. Spring St

44th Annual LA Korean Festival
Already on its 43rd year, the Los Angeles Korean Festival has become a yearly event promoting the Korean culture as well as providing an instrument in which the different cultures of Los Angeles can come together in fun and entertainment. With the different cultural communities in Los Angeles and free admission, the Los Angeles Korean Festival does a wonderful job in promoting the Korean culture as well as advocating the cultural diversity, a characteristic that defines the city of Los Angeles is known for. With the idea of multiculturalism in mind, the Los Angeles Korean Festival has grown to be one of the largest ethnic celebrations in the nation.
When: October 12-15, 2017
Where: Seoul International Park, Los Angeles

LA Documentaries at Union Station “Roller Dreams”
Metro Art is pleased to present “Roller Dreams,” (2017, 82 min, Dir. Kate Hickey) as the first installment of our documentary series about Los Angeles. Introduction by director Kate Hickey. Post screening Q&A with featured roller dancers Mad, Terrell Ferguson, Larry Pitts and Jimmy Rich.
When: Friday, October 13, 2017 from 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Where: Union Station Historic Ticketing Hall

12th Annual Pasadena ARTwalk
The 12th Annual Pasadena ArtWalk celebrates the Playhouse District with a FREE juried art show and sale from a wide variety of local artists while also offering patrons the opportunity to experience all of the amazing art the District has to offer. Set in the cultural heart of Pasadena with art, music, and activities, Green Street will provide the perfect shaded canopy for this unique, all-ages art event.
When: Saturday, October 14, 11:00AM – 6:00PM
Where: Green St. & Madison Ave. Pasadena