Posts by AHBE LAB

Goat Hike & Picnic
Come join the herd on a short relaxing hike in the San Gabriel Mountains. Only 40 tickets are available for this event. We will take a gentle hike with the goats, moms and babies together, with lots of stops for them to enjoy fresh spring grasses. sagebrush and desert almond. During stops I’ll talk about the unique landscape at Angeles Crest Creamery and how the goats fit into the ecosystem, about what they eat and how their forage behavior changes seasonally.
When: Saturday, July 22nd, 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM PDT
Where: Angeles Crest Creamery, 19830 Big Pines Hwy, Valyermo, CA 93563

Fellows in Focus: Placerita Canyon BioBlitz
Fellows members are invited to join us at Placerita Canyon, a park encompassing oak woodland, chaparral, and riparian plant communities on the north side of the San Gabriel Mountains, to help NHMLA learn more about the insects, birds, and lizards that call this preserve home. Hear from and work alongside our adventurous crew of scientists and educators seeking out answers to real-world questions. All attendees will get to participate in smoke fly catching with Brian Brown, bird watching with Kimball Garrett, ant traps with Terry McGlynn, and iNaturalist walks with Greg Pauly and Lisa Gonzalez.
When: Become a member and sign up for the walk on July 30th, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm
Where: Placerita Canyon

In Conversation: Frank Gehry and Kurt Forster
Iconic architect Frank Gehry and renowned architectural historian Kurt W. Forster explore architectural differences and similarities between sister-cities Berlin and Los Angeles on the occasion of the exhibition Berlin/Los Angeles: Space for Music, on view at the Getty Research Institute from April 25 to July 30, 2017.
When: Wednesday, July 19, 2017, at 7 pm
Where: Getty Center, Harold M. Williams Auditorium

Discussion: Arts District Murals
Since the migration of local artists to Downtown LA in the 1970s, the Arts District has become synonymous with murals, street art, and graffiti. Join us in the Public Garden for a conversation examining the history and culture of muralism in LA with art historian Isabel Rojas-Williams and muralists Kim West and Noni Olabisi.
When: Sunday, July 23, 2017, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Where: Hauser & Wirth, 901 East 3rd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013

FLAX: The distance is beautiful
Inspired by the complex landscape of the city, the dance performance enlists the participation of 60 professional and nonprofessional performers, exploring themes of community and identity, which are now more important than ever. Echoing recent unrest around the world, and setting off from different locations, the groups will march through the corridors of Downtown to gather at iconic Grand Park (200 N. Grand Avenue) for an epic performance.
When: July 22nd, 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Where: Grand Park, 200 N. Grand Avenue

Christoph Kilian: If you touch me, you’ll understand what happiness is
Carried aloft by weather balloon, a small cooling chamber rises up into the sky above Mount Hollywood. Upon reaching optimal temperature and humidity, a single snow crystal forms within the chamber and is ultimately released, falling to earth under the sun over Los Angeles. The balloon and chamber’s flight was documented by two high resolution video cameras. The launch site for the weather balloon and cooling chamber is located between two well-known Los Angeles landmarks: The Griffith Observatory and the Hollywood Sign. Artist Christoph Kilian’s installation “If you touch me, you’ll understand what happiness is” is on view at the Goethe-Institut.
When: Monday – Friday July 17th thru July 21st (hours vary)
Where: GOETHE-INSTITUT, 5750 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 100, 90036

A significant amount of investment and accompanying interest has focused across the section of the Los Angeles River located north of Downtown Los Angeles. Some of that attention has been directed toward Long Beach where the LA River empties into the Pacific Ocean, but very little public awareness exists about the sections located between the cities of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which include Cudahy [KUD-ə-hay],  Maywood, and South Gate.

AHBE Lab wanted to find out more about these stretches of communities following the river. Jiani Shen, a masters student at LSU, and Estevan Castenada, a bachelor’s student from Cal Poly Pomona, are both AHBE summer interns. They’ve been both tasked to gather information about this section along the Los Angeles River, asked to research upon open space recommendations, as well as report about connections to the adjoining communities. Both summer interns will share their observations about living within the Los Angeles landscape, this being our second post of the series from Jiani:

Our current relationship to the natural environment

We’ve long been capable of manipulating our natural environment to make our surroundings more beneficial for human activities and safety. People have always wanted to tame natural environments and make them predictable. The Los Angeles River is an example, a channelized river with a concrete bottom and sides. Because the river used to overflow its bank and intermittently flood the Los Angeles River basin, the city’s citizens and political leaders contained its flow within an approximately 450 feet wide channel.

The channel tames the river’s course and flow, stabilizing its velocity, and preventing flooding into surrounding neighborhoods.The construction of the channel took 22 years to complete. The stark concrete levee and concrete channel now manages the entire length of the Los Angeles River, from Valley to the ocean. However, this construction comes at a price: it prevents the river’s natural behavior and destroyed much of the ecological systems along the river.

The current flow of the Los Angeles River.

The original Mississippi River is another example of a waterway that frequently overflowed its banks. The river brought sediment down into the Delta during flooding, thus shaping the land. In the last 100 years humans constructed levees all along the river; the US Army Corp of Engineering built a levee to prevent the water directly flowing into Atchafalaya Basin area. The goal was to direct the river’s flow down toward New Orleans, supporting commercial river activities like shipping. As a result, the Mississippi River now has a longer river commercial route, which in turn helped New Orleans become a metropolitan city.

This map of an area just north of the Atchafalaya River shows a slice of the complex history of the Mississippi. The modern river course is superimposed on channels from 1880 (green), 1820 (red), and 1765 (blue). Even earlier, prehistoric channels underlie the more recent patterns. An oxbow lake—a crescent of water left behind when a meander (bend in the river) closes itself off—remains from 1785. A satellite image from 1999 shows the current course of the river and the old oxbow lake. Despite modern human-made changes to the landscape, traces of the past remain, with roads and fields following the contours of past channels.”

Our future relationship the natural environment
The Los Angeles River is now no longer a natural recreational area in the city’s citizens’ daily lives. However, we need to reconsider the resilient relationship between our city’s river and the urban environment that surrounds its entire length. We should find new ways to bring the LA River back into people’s life while preserving the cultural heritage that sprung forth from its existence. I believe there are three strategies Los Angeles needs to do to accomplish this goal of making the LA River an integral part of our city:

  • First: transform abandoned waterfront industries by renovating under-utilized land to improve the quality of life of neighboring communities.
  • Second: increase water front accessibility. For example, connect the bike trail from the upper river to the lower river, and enhance public transportation to river access points.
  • Third: facilitate ecological recovery, including enhance flood prevention capacity; restore LA River water quality and wildlife habitat.

Humans are naturally attracted to water and nature. When the Los Angeles River becomes a safe and ecological public recreational space it could become a new landmark instead of just an ideal place to shoot crime films.

A significant amount of investment and accompanying interest has focused across the section of the Los Angeles River located north of Downtown Los Angeles. Some of that attention has been directed toward Long Beach where the LA River empties into the Pacific Ocean, but very little public awareness exists about the sections located between the cities of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which include Cudahy [KUD-ə-hay],  Maywood, and South Gate.

AHBE Lab wanted to find out more about these stretches of communities following the river. Jiani Shen, a masters student at LSU, and Estevan Castenada, a bachelor’s student from Cal Poly Pomona, are both AHBE summer interns. They’ve been both tasked to gather information about this section along the Los Angeles River, asked to research upon open space recommendations, as well as report about connections to the adjoining communities. Both summer interns will share their observations about living within the Los Angeles landscape, with a first post from Estevan:

Graphic by Estevan Castaneda

Is there a link between housing values and the geographic elevation levels across Los Angeles?

The answer to this question may not have a direct answer. From personal experience, I’ve associated houses on higher elevations with a higher value because of the seclusion from noise and their inclusion of beautiful views. But this is not always the case. When does elevation become a valuable feature and when does it devalue a location?

Downtown Los Angeles from behind the Hollywood Sign” by James Gubera. Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

My theory is that a combination of components come into play: the neighborhood’s average income, the availability of transportation, and the elevation of one’s home. Income level would likely play a role in the possibility of the home occupants owning a car. If a family can buy a car, their need for public transportation diminishes. But when families cannot afford a car, then access to public transportation becomes a top priority.

This ties closely with the availability, or lack thereof, of other transportation modes. Let us consider two cities, Beverly Hills and Boyle Heights. These cities exist at the opposite levels of income and public transportation spectrum and present different values in relation to their similar elevations. In the case of Beverly Hills, where the top fifth percent earns up to $660,000 per year, public transportation options are sparse. This has little to no effect on the high-income communities in Beverly Hills, but it does affect the low-income communities that live there. Some families in Beverly Hills earn as little as $14,000, and public transportation is their only option for getting to and from their jobs.

“Hollywood and Beverly Hills” by Aito Aguirregabiria. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

In the case of Boyle Heights, the public transportation system is not sparse, but the amount of high quality transportation is lacking. The highest quality mode of public transportation in Boyle Heights is the Gold Line, which opened in 2009. This neighborhood’s average income is around $33,000, while the Los Angeles County average is about $58,000. Thus, the need for proper public transportation to connect these neighborhoods to the larger city of LA exists.

“Hollywood and Beverly Hills” by Aito Aguirregabiria. Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Elevation ties both factors if average income and available transportation together, creating value. Usually when homes are put on a higher elevation, they are separated from main streets and the nuisances such as noise, pollution, and trash that comes with living in close proximity of other citizens. In Beverly Hills, this results in an idealized neighborhood with a higher average housing value. But the opposite can be true when higher elevation separates people from proper public transportation. In Boyle Heights where a car is not always as readily available, this can mean a walk down or up steep slopes,which is not a desired everyday route for older and disabled citizens.

There are other variables that ultimately affect property values, but this is just my theory…

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Gabba Alley Project. Mural: DOURONE / Photo: Alissa Walker

Making LA Together Meet-and-Greet
Join us for the kickoff of the Making LA Together series with the four winning teams from our Making LA Together event, each representing Transportation, Water, Density, and Community. Here’s your chance to learn more about the projects, meet the people behind them, and find out how you can get involved to bring their ideas to life. RSVP on Facebook so we can give the bar a headcount!
When: July 16th, 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm
Where: Tabula Rasa, 5125 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90027

 

Summer Movie Nights at the LA River
Join Assemblymember Anthony Rendon, your neighbors, friends and family for an outdoor summer movie night at the Los Angeles River featuring Moana!!! Come enjoy the LA River informational booths, food trucks, and family fun activities. Make sure to bring a blanket and a comfortable chair. The movie will screen in the Los Angeles River channel!! You can bike, walk, or drive to the site. Limited parking available so get there early.
When: July 15, 2017 at 6:30pm – 10pm
Where: 5532 Imperial Hwy, South Gate, CA 90262

 

Choreography of the City: Hans Scharoun’s Philharmonie as a Landscape of the Mind
The In Studio drop-in program presents a demonstration by artist Jamie Sweetman. She explores drawing concepts on form, structure and composition using a variety of mark-making techniques, as in parallel lines, cross-hatching and contour lines. Following the demonstration, visitors are welcome to draw directly from nature in the Sculpture Garden as well as from works in the collections. Join each week to see a different demonstration, and come away with drawings of your own.
When: Thursday, July 27, 2017, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Where: Norton Simon Museum Entrance Gallery

 

Lotus Festival Echo Park Lake
It is an annual event showcasing the people and culture of Asia through verbal and stattionary arts, dances, dragon boat races, and entertainment offered free to the general public. The event is sponsred by the City of Los Angeles Dept. of Recreation and Parks and the Los Angeles lotus Festival, Inc.
When: July 15 at 12 PM to July 16 at 9 PM
Where: 751 Echo Park Ave, Los Angeles, California 90026

 

Concrete Poetry: Words and Sounds in Graphic Space
Drawn principally from the Getty Research Institute’s collection of prints, artists’ books, journals, and manuscripts documenting the international concrete poetry movement, this exhibition focuses on the visual, verbal, and sonic experiments of the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s. Featuring works by foundational figures Augusto de Campos and Ian Hamilton Finlay, Concrete Poetry explores how these artists invented new forms such as cube poems and standing poems and continuously re-created their projects across media. Poetry by contemporaries including Henri Chopin, Ernst Jandl, Mary Ellen Solt, and Emmett Williams also plays a prominent role.
When: Thru July 30th, 2017
Where: Getty Research Institute

Drawing Codes: Experimental Protocols of Architectural Representation
“Emerging technologies of design and production have opened up new ways to engage with traditional practices of architectural drawing. This exhibition, organized by the CCA Digital Craft Lab, features experimental drawings by architects who explore the impact of new technologies on the relationship between code and drawing: how rules and constraints inform the ways we document, analyze, represent, and design the built environment.” Presented by California College of the Arts / Digital Craft Lab and Woodbury University School of Architecture; Curated by Andrew Kudless & Adam Marcus
When: Saturday, Jul 8, 20175 PM
Where: WUHO Gallery 6518 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles 90028

Rebel Rebel Concert Series
Celebrate the Hammer’s summer exhibitions with four nights of free live concerts and KCRW DJs in the museum’s courtyard. Galleries open until 9 p.m. Food and cash bar. Co-presented with KCRW 89.9FM. First show of the summer: Grace Mitchell with WARGIRL + KCRW DJ Valida
When: Thursday Jul 6, 2017 7:30PM
Where: Hammer Museum Courtyard

Chinatown Summer Nights
Part food event, part summer party, Chinatown Summer Nights presents an exciting hot spot for Angelenos this summer. Taste the many culinary offerings of Chinatown and LA’s gourmet food trucks; sample the neighborhood’s wares; watch Chinese chefs perform cooking demonstrations; experience large-scale, outdoor video projections; take part in hands-on, Chinese cultural activities presented by local organizations and museums; sip on craft brews and dance in Central Plaza with 89.9 KCRW’s DJ’s!
When: 1st Saturdays in 2017: JUL 1 + AUG 5 + SEPT 2, 5pm to midnight
Where: 943 – 951 N. Broadway, Los Angeles CA 90012 (Central and West Plazas)

The Golden Portal
LA Law Library and our partners at Shared Studios bring you the Golden Portal. It’s more than Facetime and Skype; you can have actual conversations with residents in Afghanistan, Cuba, Jordan, Germany, Honduras, India, Iraq, Iran, Kenya, Mexico, Myanmar, Pakistan, Palestine, Rwanda, South Korea and the United Kingdom all without a passport.
When: Jun 22 – Aug 15, 2017 – Every Day; 8:00am – 5:00pm
Where: Los Angeles County Law Library

Game Night at Grand Central Market
Looking to unwind after a tough day at work? Searching for fast, amazing fare to satisfy your foodie cravings? Planning a non-cliche date night? Whatever your Downtown LA dilemma, the city’s oldest food hub has your back. Enter Game Night — eat, drink and play every Thursday until 10 pm.
When: Every Week on Thursday thru Dec 28, 2017
Where: Grand Central Market; 317 S Broadway Los Angeles CA 90013