Posts tagged conservation

Graphic: University of Minnesota, Duluth/Sustainable Food Systems

Graphic: University of Minnesota, Duluth/Sustainable Food Systems

It must be the season, but lately I’ve been drawn to fruits and vegetables, alongside topics surrounding sustainable food systems and eating healthy. Although I like the idea of growing my own food in my garden, my success has been limited to herbs, which is okay with me since herb gardening fits my schedule. Growing something is better than doing nothing at all. With water, energy, and waste reduction prevalent in discussions everywhere, I am transitioning to a more sustainable lifestyle by making changes in the way I have been doing things. I admit, however, that growing a crop in my garden is not one of the changes I see in my future.

Photo by LDaley_farmers market_lettuce w carrots
Photo by LDaley_farmers market red onions cropped
Photo by LDaley_farmers market tomatoes

Farmer's Market photos: Linda Daley

Farmer’s Market photos: Linda Daley

Food is a leisure activity for me. On Sundays, I like going to the farmer’s market and taking part in my community’s weekly ritual of socializing while shopping. Instead of driving there, I walk. I get some exercise, chat with some neighbors, and bring home the seasonal bounties offered by our local farmers. It’s a pretty enjoyable way of spending a Sunday morning.

Baby steps. “Going green” does not have to be such a daunting transition.

April is officially World Landscape Architecture Month. All month AHBE LAB will be exploring and celebrating the many facets of our profession, specifically the topics, ideas, and themes which influence our work as landscape architects, both locally and globally.

Photo: Calvin Abe/AHBE Landscape Architects

Photo: Calvin Abe/AHBE Landscape Architects

This photograph captured while flying over Lake Casitas, a man-made lake located about 80 mile north of Los Angeles, illustrates an interesting landscape pattern formed by the ongoing California drought. As the water level drops in the lake – at its max Lake Casitas offers a capacity of 254,000 acre ft. – we begin to see how vegetation is associated through its topography. The varying layers of vegetation is due to the mositure content of the soil, topographic elevations, and the physical soil composition. This demonstrates how nature builds an ecology that is interdependent on multiple levels.