Posts tagged rain

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As another winter storm system fast approaches to immerse Los Angeles in torrential rain to threaten to our state’s infrastructure and landscape to the limit (this one supposedly the biggest one yet), it’s easy to forget only a short while ago we were all praying for rain. Little did I know California has employed the aid of rainmakers utililizing alternative methods to manifest results and mitigate the drought.

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All photos by Linda Daley

All photos by Linda Daley

Los Angeles was blessed with rain again, the first of the spring season. It’s been awhile since I last enjoyed the rain’s ephemeral effects on the pace of the city. The sound of rain — especially its drumming in allegro rhythm against a window – triggers memories of my childhood fascination with storms. I’d sit by a window for long periods and watch a downpour empty the streets of people, leaving a sense of tranquil solitude in its wake.

by LDaley_storm sky

by LDaley_succulent

by LDaley_flower (2)

I remain connected to rain in this way. When it arrives, I become a bystander, entranced as nature takes control and the city transforms. After a storm, the city is rewarded with a sense of renewal, brought on by the bright skies and clear views of distant mountains. I feel re-introduced to the city after a rain, and ready to engage with it once again.

by LDaley_clear sky

I decided to capture the rain, but not utilizing rainwater harvesting as you might expect from a landscape architect. I set out to capture my sentiment about it through photography. I also discovered a poem by California State Poet Laureate Dana Gioia which beautifully captures the sense of spiritual renewal emerging within us following a storm event. I end with his poem Los Angeles after the Rain.

by LDaley_raindrops on cercis verticalLos Angeles after the Rain – by Dana Gioia
Back home again on one of those bright mornings
when the city wakes to find itself reborn.
The smog gone, the thundering storm
blown out to sea, birds
frantic in their joyous cacophony, and the mountains,
so long invisible in the haze,
newly rise with the sun.

It is a morning snatched from Paradise,
a vision of the desert brought to flower—
of Eve standing in her nakedness,
immortal Adam drunk with all
the gaudy colors of the world,
and each taste and touch, each
astounding pleasure still waiting to be named.

The city stirs and stretches
like a young man waking after love.
Sunlight stroking the skin and the
promiscuous wind whispering
“Seize the moment. Surrender to the air’s
irrefutable embrace. Trust me that today
even seduction leads to love.”

Too many voices overhead. Too many scents
commingle in the stark perfume
of green winter freshened by the rain.
This is no morning for decisions.
A day to ditch responsibility, look up
old friends, and dream
of quiet love, impossible resolutions.

 

Image A

About 12 years ago I did a major home remodel and I remember when the building inspector told me that in order to get final sign-off of my permit that I needed to install rain gutters throughout the house. The gutters had to be directed to the driveway or directly to the street. I proceeded to comply to get my final approval, but I wondered why my rain water had to be drained away from my landscape.

After two years of watching rain water flow to the street, I decided to do something about it. I re-hired the same rain gutter contractor and had them reconfigure all of the downspouts so that rainwater would flow into several rain capture strategies, including landscape planters, dry well, permeable driveway, and a rain barrel. Fortunately, my house sits in an area of Los Angeles that has well-drained soils – my soil is very sandy and drains about 2 to 3 inches per hour. – which is key to having these strategies succeed.

Here are four rain capture strategies that I used around my home.

Image B
1. Use Raised Planters: I built a raised planter in front of the house to capture half of the roof drainage. Since I buried part of my raised foundation I made sure we waterproofed the house footing to eliminate moisture from migrating to the wooden sill. I kept the soil level 6 inches below the top of the foundations. I reconfigured the front portion of the roof water to this planter.  I planted a combination of Chondropetalum and Agaves which will take both drought and wet conditions. However,  mostly drought these days. (image A)

Diagram by: Richard Quinn

Diagram by: Richard Quinn


2. Install a Dry Well: I raised my front yard around 14 inches so that none of my front yard drainage would run over the sidewalk. I installed a “Dry Well” along the street edge. You can see the two plastic drain covers which not only captures the surface water, but also gave me a place to observe the drywell. The drywell basically consist of a 20 foot long, 24″ diameter perforated PVC pipe in a 36″ deep trench that is filled with gravel and a 12″ layer of topsoil. This has been my flower garden, strawberry patch and vegetable garden for the last 10 years. (Image B)

Driveway
3. Think Permeability:  I re-built my driveway to be more permeable. I placed gravel strips along the entire length of the driveway to capture all the surface water. It essentially created a series of “mini-check dams” that stopped the miscellaneous water from running down to the curb. Each gravel strip had a 24″ deep by 12″ wide gravel filled area to hold the water. What you see on the surface is a 4″ wide strip which most people think is simply a aesthetic design feature.

Image D1
4. Add Rain Barrels:  I installed rain barrels to capture, hold and re-use the rain water. We use this water to irrigation our surrounding landscape. If you go on to the City of Los Angeles DWP website you may qualify for a rebate. Check it out.

If you need help installing it, the City of Los Angeles has a great video. Rain barrels are inexpensive and easy to install. Here is a video from the DWP website: