Posts tagged video

““The unfathomable, gloomy elegance of this splashing and rumbling landscape painting — the movement of the waves, the circling of the birds, the lifting of the cloud cover — is followed by an arc shot resembling a brushstroke that tells us about everything we have already forgotten while gazing at the static and precisely framed mountain: the world beyond the image.” – Alejandro Bachmann

Austrian artist Lukas Marxt initially began in search of landscapes untouched by humankind – remote places across the globe unknown or forgotten, existing in what is often referred to in geological durations as “deep time”. Across these increasingly disappearing spaces devoid of human activity, Marxt’s solitary interactions and observations within barren landscapes conjures the temporal nature of humankind’s imprint upon the planet, appearing in an instant, then as quickly fading back into the confluence of time. Over time his work has evolved to fold humankind into the narrative of the greater landscape, superimposing our world back onto a holistic perspective. His works evoke equal moments of wonder and sadness, connection and solitude.

Currently residing in Southern California during a six month residency researching the ecological and socio-political structures surrounding the Salton Sea, seven of Marxt’s videos will be screening next week on Wednesday at the Goethe-Institut Los Angeles. Even if you’re unable to attend next, anyone can immerse themselves into the flow of Marxt’s deep time work thanks to Vimeo.

“Aerial photography has existed since we flew balloons. What interests me is that everybody now has access to it. It has sort of become a common object. I would no longer call it a god’s-eye view because it has become so present. What interests me most is that you can steer it yourself and direct it. You can take flight and rescale the landscape in ways in which it becomes difficult to distinguish between the macro and the micro.” – Lukas Marxt

This is an exercise in aerial land use interpretation.

Sitting by the window and reading the landscape from the air, I wonder, “What below can be deciphered?” On our flight from Philadelphia to Detroit, we flew over Lake Erie and the Canadian island of Panton-le-Fou, Ontario. Centuries of European settlement have impacted the landscape below – from the buildings and roads to the fencerows and agricultural land patterns – providing clues to the astute observer as to what happened below.

What do you see when you “read” this island?

Abramović performing The Artist Is Present, Museum of Modern Art, March 2010 - Creative Commons photo by Shelby Lessig

Abramović performing The Artist Is Present, Museum of Modern Art, March 2010 – Creative Commons photo by Shelby Lessig

While visiting MoMA during the spring of 2010, I stumbled into performance artist Marina Abramović’s installation, “The Artist Is Present“. If you are not familiar with the piece, it consisted of Abramović silently sitting in a chair and inviting members of the public to silently sit across from her. This went on for 2-1/2 months. It was an enthralling spectacle – as was the accompanying retrospective of her four-decade long career.

Watching this live, I came to the objective realization that this needed to be re-created with Star Wars action figures. With less than 10 shopping days left until we find out what happened to Luke Skywalker, I wanted to share my version of the events that transpired in that gallery – and declare myself an artist – tongue firmly in cheek.

Hringvegur_Contact Sheet

In addition to chronicling my recent circumnavigation of the Icelandic landscape via the production of a feature film, we also took plenty of still images – digital and analog. At each stop for camera adjustment, file backup, or leg-stretch, we whipped out our trusty Polaroid OneStep 600 Express instant film camera – because is there really a better format to capture the subtlety of this jaw-droppingly dynamic landscape of geysers, glaciers, and gas stations?

One issue: where to get film? I got puzzled looks from the Walgreens downstairs from the office; apparently sold out. By chance, I overheard a conversation on the Red Line – two patrons talking about a place on the internets called “the Amazon”. I rushed home and fired up my Hayes Smartmodem 300, logged onto CompuServe, and eureka – my dream of shooting Polaroids in Iceland would come true – and at only $2.81 a pop!

Upon our return these archival quality prints were scanned and cleaned up a bit in Photoshop – a painstaking process documented in the accompanying video below.

Once you have absorbed these prints in all their high resolution glory, you will probably feel as if you have also experienced the dreamlike Icelandic landscape itself.

Evan-Iceland-AfterEffects

Three of us from AHBE spent time in Iceland this summer engaging with its incredible landscapes. My personal goal for the trip was to capture footage for a feature film, Hringvegur, a Kickstarter-funded time-lapse circumnavigation of the island.

Given the nature of the film, it was essentially edited in-camera. But since returning in mid-August, I have been busy editing an audio collage of wild sounds (ambient landscapes, Icelandic top-40 radio, conversations, etc.) and fine-tuning the visuals. This image correction is done using Adobe After Effects – which is you are not familiar – is basically Photoshop over time. Basically, I am going through two hours of raw 4k footage adjusting the image color, lens compensation, position and rotation. While tedious, it it fun to relive the journey frame by frame.

Enjoy this short video of the editing process – from kilometer 678.7 outside of Breiðdalsvík, to our flat tire around 706.9 – about an hour from Egilsstaðir. I hope have my second feature film completed by the end of 2015.